Topping Up Your Job Satisfaction Level

Picture this . . .drive22

At year-end, you can say, “We hit our numbers!” You’re proud of this achievement and even more proud that you can quantify your specific contribution and that it equals five times your salary. How satisfying would that be for you?

I’m not talking about a bullet on your resume that says you were a key player in a $5 million project. I’m talking about what it would it be like to know the value of your contribution—how the knowledge and experience you brought to the team and what you have learned this year through learning sessions and experience have impacted this year’s results.

Many people know the overall project numbers but not their own individual numbers. For some, getting specific financial data isn’t simple, but it can be done over time when you analyze the factors that helped the team hit their numbers. Would you see yourself differently if you knew what your individual numbers were?

A good leader takes time to help the team and individuals see how their efforts connect to the big picture. But do you ask questions, and do you expect to get real answers? In a rapid-paced work environment, appreciation and recognition are terrific, but this demanding pace is here to stay. Wouldn’t it be valuable to know what is helping you personally make a difference?

In leaner organizations, people are being promoted earlier in their careers—managing upwards is a necessary skill to develop. If you are helping to improve business results, why not dive into some of the details and find out what you contributed? At least you will be talking numbers that is the language of those driving the strategic plans. What better way to learn more about senior management mindsets than by discussing what concerns them most?

Confidence comes with competence, and competence builds from contribution. Why not put a number to your contribution efforts?  It could be blurry at first, but it will become sharper and more focused with time and attention. You may think this approach shows signs of a big ego. The more you know how competent you are, however, the more confidence you have that is based in reality. Imagine being in a business meeting where tough decisions are being made and your perspectives and point of view are respected and influence outcomes!

Is it egotistical to quantify your contribution?  If you want to brag about it, perhaps your actions will be perceived as such. During uncertain times, though, people look to those who make sense and have the conviction to bring up points that need to be considered before committing people to a course of action that is uncertain and unproven. Are you ready to top up your satisfaction level?

 

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