What’s the impact of your managerial mindset?

When you think of the managers you have had, what kind of managerial behavior brings out the best in you?

You have probably spent time working for at least one territorial manager—the guy who felt his status with his peers was more important than what customers needed—a situation so bad that it added extra work for everyone on the team, and the difficult dynamics between departments made it difficult to get business results.

In a recent Inc. magazine article, Geoffrey James discussed the “8 Core Beliefs of Extraordinary Bosses.” He highlights the differences between average bosses and extraordinary bosses. To me, his article defines “then” and “now”—how it used to be in command-and-control environments versus the shift to more dynamic, fully engaged workplaces.

What do you do when the roadway turns into a river?
I see the old management model as a roadway that has turned into a river. Traction is defined differently. The old vehicle doesn’t get traction on water, and leaders must adapt to navigating a river that takes a different vehicle. It means a leader’s source of power now comes from a very different skill set.

An example is how a leader handles mistakes—a punitive approach where the driving motivation is to not make mistakes and risk being singled out for ridicule or the learning culture where mistakes that are unavoidable in today’s complex workplace are seen as learning experiences. (Yes, I know that some mistakes are deadly, but many are loaded with opportunity.)

Outdated mindsets hinder smart, hardworking, and talented people from getting results. New ways of doing business require resourceful, creative people. You may find yourself caught in the crosscurrent between an old-style culture and a new-style boss or an adaptive culture and an old-style boss. Your challenge is to navigate in ways that accomplish what’s necessary for your role and for the business strategy. If you are caught in a crosscurrent, are you spinning out of control or navigating your way through?

Beliefs affect your mindset, and mindset affects your managerial behavior. What you say and do has an impact on others—even your silence sends a message.

What does your particular managerial mindset reveal about your beliefs?  Let me know………

 Read Geoffrey James article 

You are welcome to share this post with someone who is caught in the cross current between the old and the new management behavior. 

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